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New Year Resolutions

Proverbial New You

Again, we are in the eve of a new year and most Americans are ready for that proverbial “new you.” This is understandable because by now our over-indulgence in manufactured foods and drinks has made us feel corrupted and bloated with excess. The traditional holiday gifts tend to promote misgivings about our health, as the customary consumer frenzy that began late November has climaxed, and now we wish to escape from it, perhaps even rejuvenate our lives hence forth. Some could say we are finally respecting self-preservation and subconsciously want to reduce the amount of industrial goods, materialism and artificiality in our lives.

A Balanced Life

Although it is generally not considered this way, I propose that the “new you” we desire represents a more primitive, more biologically authentic, identity that resides within each of us. Almost certainly, this identity includes a physique that is thinner, stronger and more aesthetically appealing, and follows a subconscious realization that our modern, “civilized,” physique is not the epitome of our success. But mostly, we seek change because we are frankly uncomfortable in our own skin. So, on the eve of every new year, we are compelled toward a more balanced life, to consume whole foods (like those our ancestors subsisted on), to engage in more exercise, to express more love and to perhaps even spend more time in nature’s refuge.

Primordial Wisdom

I urge the reader to cultivate his/her primordial wisdom, instead of searching for techno-health gimmicks as a means of self-improvement. Through our innate biological wisdom, we aim to improve our fundamental identity, our biological identity. Most certainly, the creation of a leaner physique representing improved function symbolizes a better relationship with ourselves. Don’t underestimate the power of fulfilling a new identity in a literal sense because it is unlikely that our personal renewal will be real or will endure past the Super Bowl weekend without such a change. This is how a Naturvore thinks.

 
 
dr-harpe

Charles C. Harpe, MD is a naturvore (noun), an omnivorous human who resists eating manufactured foods. His passion is discovering biological authenticity.